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GCRF demonstrate impact in developing countries: round 2, phase 1

Funding details
Registration opens
02 Mar 2020, 00:00
Registration closes
06 May 2020, 12:00
Closes
06 May 2020, 12:00
Award
Your project’s maximum grant can be no more than £60,000 for phase 1 and your total eligible costs must be between £85,000 and £120,000.
Organisation
Global Challenges Research Fund
Summary

The Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) will invest up to £9.3 million in prototype stage projects. The projects must have the potential to transform lives in developing countries, through appropriately designed innovation that responds to real market demand.

We will support projects that address one of the 10 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through the development of innovative processes, products and services. These projects must lead to the deployment of those innovations within one OECD DAC list recipient country in scope for this competition.

This funding is split into 2 phases:

  • Discovery: enabling businesses to gain insights into local market feasibility for the innovation prior to prototyping.
  • Prototype phase: to test, validate and improve a prototype of the innovation in a developing country market.

This competition is to secure funding for phase 1 projects. Only successful phase 1 applicants will be eligible to apply for the phase 2 funding.

Your phase 1 discovery project:

  • must include human-centred research and design to make sure your idea meets the needs of customers and users, and your prototype plans reflect realistic use cases
  • can include activities to ensure that your prototype will be technically feasible in the local context of a developing country
  • must determine how the innovation could be effectively prototyped in that country during phase 2

Your project’s maximum grant can be no more than £60,000 for phase 1 and your total eligible costs must be between £85,000 and £120,000. Projects must start by 1 October 2020, finish by 31 March 2021 and last no more than 6 months.

The technical project work can be led by an organisation from any country. The administrative work must be led by a business from the UK.

The administrative lead:

  • must be a UK registered business, of any size
  • will be the recipient of the award
  • will distribute any funding to the international (non-UK) partners
  • will manage and be accountable for the project’s finances in accordance with the terms and conditions of the award
  • must claim funding through this competition

The technical lead:

  • can be from any country
  • can be a business of any size, research organisation, public sector organisation, research and technology organisation or not for profit organisation
  • will lead on the development of the scope, work packages within the project and other work from a technical perspective
  • must claim funding through this competition

If your organisation is a UK registered business it can be both the administrative and technical lead.

Academic institutions cannot lead or work alone.

The technical and administrative leads can work in collaboration with others, including international partners. You do not have to include international partners in this phase 1 competition but you must include them in phase 2.

To collaborate with the lead organisation, you must:

  • be a business of any size, research organisation, public sector organisation, research and technology organisation (RTO), or a charity or other not for profit organisation
  • be invited to take part by the administrative lead

International partners will be funded through the administrative lead, on the same grant percentage terms as UK organisations of the same category. Your project can include partners that do not receive any of this competition’s funding. Their costs will count towards the total eligible project costs.

Phase 1 is to help project teams investigate and improve the market feasibility of launching an innovative prototype in one OECD DAC list recipient country within the scope for this competition. It should determine how the innovation could be effectively prototyped in that country during phase 2.

To ensure that your innovation has the highest chance of being successfully adopted, you will need to understand diverse cultural expectations, attitudes and local context in the developing country. In order to deliver the desired economic and societal impacts, you must take into account gender equality and social inclusion issues.

During phase 1, your project must involve work in the chosen developing country. This can be done by any partner in the project, but you must name the partner or partners in your application.

If you are invited to phase 2, your project must focus on research and development (R&D), testing and prototyping work within the developing country. You must collaborate with at least one partner with a legal entity in that country during phase 2.

KTN will be running applicant briefings as follows:

Webcast: 9.30am-1pm, 10th March 2020 – click here to register (a recording will be available afterwards)

London briefing: 9.30am-2pm, 10th March 2020, etc.venues Victoria, 1 Drummond Gate, London SW1V 2QQ – click here to register

Edinburgh briefing: 9.30am-4.30pm, 12th March 2020, Radisson Blu Hotel, The Royal Mile, 80 High Street, Edinburgh EH1 1TH – click here to register