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What’s discovery science ever done for us? Calling on all sectors

Posted on 10/09/2019

Contribute to the development of the UK’s funding of science by completing this short survey.

KTN is working with 4 Learned Societies, the Council for Mathematical Sciences, the Institute of Physics, the Royal Society of Biology and the Royal Society of Chemistry, to learn how discovery science and maths have contributed and benefited the UK.

 

Discovery research, also known as fundamental, basic, pure or curiosity-driven research, is theoretical or experimental work undertaken to acquire new knowledge without any intended direct application or use. It plays a role in the wider research and innovation landscape, alongside, for example, applied research and experimental development.

 

Discovery science is not sector-specific; thus, a wide range of companies are impacted by it and most importantly, all industries benefit from it. For example, while it’s common knowledge that the internet was developed through work at CERN, it is less well-known that the same field (particle physics) has also provided technology to improve the rendition of images in the gaming industry.

 

This research seeks to create a coherent, up-to-date picture of the impacts of discovery science and maths research in the UK, on our society, environment and economy, including its role within the wider research and innovation landscape.

 

While the role and value of R&D in the UK’s economy and society is well understood, evidence regarding discovery science and maths research is more limited and often fragmented and out of date.  This research will help to show the interplay between discovery research and other types of research, and the associated impacts, providing a stronger evidence base to inform decision making in government and research funding agencies on how to ensure the funding landscape can deliver the best outcomes from investment in R&D.

 

We need inputs from all industries and academia. Please take 5 minutes to complete the survey here and contribute to the development of the UK’s funding of science and the wider benefits that this research could bring.