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Uncertainty quantification and management study group with industry announced, 20-22 March 2019

Posted on 29/10/2018

Warwick University will host the fourth ‘uncertainty quantification and management study group with industry’ next year.

The study group will bring together a multidisciplinary group of researchers and industrialists from across the UK to work on three to four problems over three intensive days to come up with solutions.  The industry problems will focus around a central theme of decision making in virtual design and will be sourced from sectors as diverse as semiconductor fabrication, welding applications, gas turbine blade manufacture and drug discovery.

There are two ways to be involved in this group:

  1. Companies: if you are a UK business and wish to pose a problem, please contact KTN’s Knowledge Transfer Manager for Industrial Mathematics, Matt Butchers here with a short description of the challenge.
  2. Researchers: if you are researcher from a UK university who wishes to take part, please register here.  There is a small charge for most participants.

Prior to the workshop, the research team and collaborators will identify companies who have interesting problems in this space and work them into challenge use-cases with accompanying datasets if appropriate.

The KTN is delighted to be working with the University of Warwick Centre for Predictive Modelling, and the University of Liverpool Institute for Risk and Uncertainty.  This is the fourth in a highly successful series of events tackling some of the hardest problems in UK manufacturing.  To date we have worked on problems from Airbus, Zenotech, Jaguar Land Rover, Rolls-Royce, the MTC, the Atomic Weapons Establishment, AstraZeneca and High Speed Two.

Manufacturing contributes over £6.7 tr to the global economy and the UK is a major contributor.  Virtual design through modelling and simulation is extremely attractive for manufacturing and design; it can significantly speed up the development cycle, and substitute with simulations some real-life tests necessary in many cases for approval of new materials.  A particular challenge is in developing decision support tools which are able to realistically incorporate uncertainty estimates from multiple sources.  How uncertainties propagate between scales (atomic, macroscopic, component / system level) and ultimately how these feed into a decision-making process in an industrial and commercial context is a difficult, open challenge; what might be termed as models to decisions.

You can register for a place at the study group here.

 

The organisers are very grateful for contributions from Warwick University and Warwick Engineering.